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Rum Bottle Tree in Old Road St. Kitts

There are quite a few tourist attractions in Old Road St. Kitts, however, the one that drew our attention was the old tree with rum bottles hanging from it. Pondering what the history behind it was, we came to find out its significance is in no history book but just something people decided to do.

After drinking a bottle of rum the bottle was tied to a string and hang from the tree. This has been going on for years.  It is now a tourist destination. This my friends is somewhat a sight to see.

Tell us more do you know anything about this Rum Bottle Tree?

bottletreelev

rum bottle tree

Photo credit : blog.sfgate.com

Photo credit : blog.sfgate.com

Photo credit: winecompass.blogspot.com

Photo credit: winecompass.blogspot.com

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Historical Churches in Nevis.

St. Thomas’s Anglican Church.

This church was reputed to be the first church built in the Caribbean and the oldest church in the Caribbean. It was built in 1643. This church was built to serve the town of Jamestown, the island’s original capital that disappeared due to a tidal wave. The church is perched high on a hill overlooking St. Kitts. There is also a vault that holds the remains of John Huggins (1763 – 1821), the founder of Bath Hotel.

Photo credit: www.explorenevis.com

Photo credit: www.explorenevis.com

Cottle Church

Cottle Church was built by John Cottle who was once the President of Nevis and a planter in 1824. This was the only church where slaves and master worshiped together. A very lenient slave owner, Cottle created this Anglican Church, which was never consecrated, since it was illegal at time for slaves to worship. The structure was severely damaged in a 1974 earthquake and again in 1989 during Hurricane Hugo. Cottle Church is still a primary tourist attraction and is presently undergoing restoration to stabilize and to ensure its historical significance for the future.

Photo credit: www.explorenevis.com

Photo credit: www.explorenevis.com

St. Paul’s Anglican Church  

This parish church was built about 1830 in a typical cruciform plan with gabled roof. The stain glass windows are in memory of Rev. Daniel Gatward Davies, priest from 1812 to 1825, who converted slaves before the emancipation. Next to the church is another stone building, which was the parish school. Inside the walled yard are graves dating to 1669.

Photo credit: www.pinterest.com

Photo credit: www.pinterest.com

St. John’s Fig Tree Church

The delightful stone church dates back to the 1680’s and is known because the historic marriage record of Lord Horatio Nelson and Frances Nisbet is preserved there. In 1886, the register obtained international attention at the Colonial Indian Exhibition in London.  It reads as a follows: “1787 March 11th. Horatio Nelson, Esquire, Captain of His Majesty’s ship Boreas, to Francis Herbert Nisbet, Widow”.

Photo credit: buckleysboyz.page.tl

Photo credit: buckleysboyz.page.tl

St. James Windward Church

Built in the late 17th century in the north part of the island, this church is one of the three Anglican Churches in the Caribbean to display a black crucifix. Its earliest grave marker dates to 1679. The church has been renovated several times since it was constructed, but the grave markers within the church have always been carefully preserved.

Photo credit: www.zazzle.com

Photo credit: www.zazzle.com

St. George’s Anglican Church

This church was built in the year 1670 and has undergone reconstruction several times due to earthquake damage. This quaint little church rests amongst the backdrop of the towering Nevis Peak and is adorned with a bright red roof. The rural setting makes for wonderful photographs of this religious building which is still in use today.

Photo credit: myirietime.com

Photo credit: myirietime.com

Gingerland Methodist Church

Built in 1844 and is well known for its unique octagonal shape. Constructed from grey-hued stones the massive structure still holds services for its congregation. One of the first things you’ll notice is the tower’s interesting open framework. The stone walls protect the grounds and the wooden shutters provide needed protection to its windows from possible hurricane and tropical winds.

Photo credit: www.explorenevis.com

Photo credit: www.explorenevis.com

Charlestown Methodist Church

A massive stone structure constructed around the year 1844 in the historic town and capital of Charlestown, Nevis. It is one of the largest churches on Nevis and was built by the Methodist who arrived in the 1800’s. The Methodists believed that the African slaves, who had been brought to the islands to work the sugar plantations, should be educated in religion and the English language. The church still holds services for its congregation today. The pulpit is raised on a wooden platform making it easier for viewing and around the in interior of the church is a balcony which helps to provide plenty of seating.

Photo credit: www.explorenevis.com

Photo credit: www.explorenevis.com

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